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Written by: Sam Fragoso on January 25, 2012

January 25, 2012 | 10 comments | Featured, Old Format

Haywire

Gina Carano reinvents the wheel of sexy females beholding a fierce bravado in Steven Soderbergh’s kinetic, jazzy thrill ride Haywire.

Written by Lem Dobbs (The Score & Dark City) the film follows in the tradition of the Soderbergh-esque narrative. We receive many plotlines with great actors jumbled into one film, all of which will – by the end – coalesce in some fashion.

Our protagonist, though, is freelance covert operative Mallory Kane (Carano). She’s a taut and intense woman who is hired by her handler (who may have been her lover at one point played by Ewan McGregor) to head to Dublin to do a supposed “easy” pick up.

As the mission proceeds, the tide slowly shifts. Through a series of transitive events, Carano’s partner and all her associates double cross her – attempting to assassinate, before she gets back into the United States.

With only Kane’s father on her side (played by Bill Paxton), she’s on the run. In attempts to figure out why this is all happening to her, though, the narrative of Haywire gradually unravels into an enigmatic piece of film.

The all-star cast including Michael Douglas, Michael Fassbender, Ewan McGregor, and Antonio Banderas, lend a hand to Soderbergh’s prolific and ingenious direction.

Haywire is periodically perplexing – attempting to mange several narratives and ultimately coming to a conclusion where a rational is necessary – but the filmmaker is a master of intertwining screenplays.

What’s more refreshing than the film’s plethora of great actors, are the action sequences. Combat set pieces that were clearly strategized, thought out, and planned, make Kane’s fighting tactics on screen, all the more convincing and satisfying.

To those who feel this could be a tad confusing, I offer up suggestions: pay attention to the details, don’t take mid-film naps, and use common sense. A great deal of scenes that would typically be exploited in the tropes of contemporary cinema, are merely implied in Haywire.

The nuances throughout the film are invigorating. It’s good to see (if baffling) something as exhilarating (though certainly problematic) and calibrated with such distinguished aesthetics, being released in the middle of January. Otherwise known as the dead zone of cinema.

Alas, the blistering, wholly enticing Haywire should be warmly welcomed.

Rating: ★★★☆

Haywire

Haywire (2011)

Cast: Gina Carano, Ewan McGregor, Michael Douglas

Director: Steven Soderbergh

Writer: Lem Dobbs

Runtime: 93 minutes

Genre: thriller, action

Trailer Haywire

Comments

There are 10 comments for this post.

  1. Eric on January 25, 2012 6:09 pm

    Glad to hear you liked this one, Sam. I am really looking forward to seeing it myself. As you said, it’s not often we get a quality move released in January.

  2. Sam Fragoso on January 25, 2012 6:22 pm

    Definitely.

    It’s nice to see valuable pieces of film being released in a middling month of crap.

  3. Scott Lawlor on January 26, 2012 4:03 am

    I am super happy we both came away from this film with the same amount of enjoyment.

    Great review matey

  4. Sam Fragoso on January 26, 2012 5:16 pm

    I read your review right after I finished writing mine.

    Glad we agreed that the film is of quality.

  5. Andrew on January 31, 2012 3:46 am

    I think anyone who can sit through an Ocean’s 11 film can sit through this without much difficulty. Non-linear, split narratives are part of Soderbergh’s standard bag of tricks. Haywire‘s no Inception in terms of complexity; it jumps around a bit and gives you information slightly out of order, and if you can keep with that, you’re good. If not, just watch Gina Carano beat the tobacco juice out of every man in the cast.

    It’s interesting that Carano is stacked up alongside actual actors, whereas most action stars in the past– non-actors themselves– have often been cast with people who are even worse at acting than they are.

  6. Sam Fragoso on January 31, 2012 3:36 pm

    Another interesting nuance by Soderbergh.

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  9. Novroz on March 7, 2012 10:26 am

    I think the movie is okay…nothing special \or to remember with.

  10. Sam Fragoso on March 7, 2012 10:53 am

    Really? It’s about the film I’ve come to truly like this year.

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